The Search for the 2015 GreenOvators | Round 1

Early August, a young emerging hack-a-thon called “The Search for the 2015 GreenOvators” started the search for ideas with the potential to make a revolution in the greening of MSMEs (Micro Small Medium Enterprises). The workshop and hack-a-thon’s first round out of three was last Saturday, August 29 2015.

The Search for the 2015 Greenovators Participants


The event was held in the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources’ social hall from around 8:00 AM to 7:30 PM. Many great and green ideas were presented to hopefully raise awareness or form a habit for the sake of the country’s future. Some familiar faces were present in the GreenOvators hack-a-thon —‘s CEO Lyle Jover, a judge in the pitching battleground, and‘s Pinky Natividad, a mentor for these aspiring green-trepreneurs. These teams went through a 5 hour long roast to make the best Business Model — the biggest criterion for the round.



Some of these teams, namely JuanBill and ShakeStop, considered integrating

JuanBill’s Jeremy Lloyd De Jesus

Bitcoins into their work, by either accepting them for sales for ShakeStop, or somehow centered the application’s usage around the crypto-currency. Will the usage of Bitcoin be an edge for these teams, or will it just be another turn-off for the GreenOvator judges?


taken from

BEEKO: eBahagi Kaith Rhee Lopez
3 in 1 Trash Detector Noel A. Baga Jr.
Buy My Garbage Reuben Capio
Carbon Track Paul Aragones
EcoWebs Susana P. Guerrero
Ensa (EnergySAver) Kristine Quirante
eRecycle Jezebel Carcer
Green Checklist Em Bueta
GreenFormation Rachel de Villa
Hapi Verdie Al Santos
iGreen Edlynne Kaith Ravago
InvesTree Vicky Martinez
JuanBill Jeremy Lloyd de Jesus
Profityr James Brown B. Bete
Resiklo Jodielyn Francisco
ShakeStop Andre Cauilan
Solar Hybrid Grid Rudy Engracia
Solarize Archie Bautista
Stitches Adean Ressan M. Ladia
Trash Talk Erwin Joseph L. Manuel
Waste Book Ian Samonte
Waste Line John Enrick Pleños
Wrapp Rhoda Lyn H. Ramos


Around next week, the list of qualifying teams for the next round held on September 12, 2015 will be posted here on NewsBTC Philippines

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As a fourteen-year-old high school student who has to balance studying for a test and writing up an article, you’d assume my answer definitely has to be a yes, but say you had yourself quite a debt, and you’re flat broke with not a single peso in your pocket. Could bitcoin save you from such a crisis?

Well, yes. As long as you have skill and talent you can pretty much at least get somewhere in paying your debts. You’re a graphics artist? Why not show off your work and try to get hired by an indie game development team or a web developer needing resources? Think you can write music or voice act? How about HTML or CSS? There are many things you can get into to try and pay off your theoretical debt.

So yes, you can use it to get yourself a few extra bills in your pocket, but you shouldn’t exactly depend solely on bitcoin to pay for all your bills. Sure, if your income from bitcoin is really that big, why not, right? Still, bitcoin is better as a backup plan, if not just another bonus method of income. You’re better off doing your actual job than do a bitcoin job at the moment, but we’re not really answering the question.

For a very serious question, there’s really no serious answer that I can give. Startups that were successful would quickly jump in and say yes, and meanwhile bankers that lose from bitcoin’s growth would just say no. The typical bitcoin community member would try to get you to jump into the bandwagon and join in, while there’s always the guy who claims bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme (which I seriously have to keep saying every now and then, no it’s not!).

The truth in the end is that the question is way too broad to be answered; yet it’s still a very common query asked by newcomers who just recently discovered bitcoin and are interested. So take it from a young startup just making his first steps into the bitcoin community. I’m just a student, and I get to do what I like and want and for it I’m earning money and making friends.

From what I have gone through, to the people I’ve met, yes. Bitcoin is worth getting into. As long as you can persevere and work hard, something will surely come out of your bitcoin career.

If you’ve read the first part of this episodic informative article series, then you should be introduced to bitcoin already. You should already have a bitcoin wallet, know your bitcoin address and you should have an active presence in the community. So you’ve gotten yourself some bitcoin, now what are you going to do with it? You’re not exactly going to twiddle your thumbs again until something happens right? Just think of it, your first purchase. What could it be? That nice handbag or that new video game you’ve been saving up for all year? Isn’t it exciting? Well, what if you could pay for it – with bitcoin?


So you already got yourself money by being on your computer all day long? Well, why not make it even more 21st century by spending that money being on your computer all day long? There are already many Philippine services you can spend your money on, from CashCashPinoy and MetroDeal we’ve already mentioned so many times and through going to the local community groups to see if you can come to a deal. Certain merchants accept bitcoin on OLX and other peer-to-peer merchant sites, so why not?

Bitcoin transfers are quicker and more secure, but they can be fraudulent, so before buying anything, ensure that the merchant you’re buying from has a good reputation and has good and positive feedback from previous customers. If the item you want can be found online and are purchasable with bitcoin as a payment method, you’re in luck.


If you ever had the misfortune of having to deal with a site that has what you want but doesn’t accept bitcoin as a payment method, it may be a bit tricky. If you want something on Amazon or eBay, a gift card might do the trick. The best place to get gift cards are on Gyft, which is for US users only, so you may want to chat up a friend or a community member who can get that for you, try other sites.

PayPal can be a handy, as PayPal isn’t exactly confident and comfortable with bitcoin around the place, and they’re pretty open about it. If you really positively have to use PayPal, you can try having it traded through a merchant or follow the next part of the guide.


For those of you whose fathers, mothers and relatives are Overseas Filipino Workers or OFWs, you may already be familiar with remittances. This is money sent by a worker abroad to his or her family, and while you’re not exactly the target audience, it’s still pretty great and reliable. and allow you to send bitcoin and pick it up at their HQ for free or at your local LBC, Cebuana Lhuillier and so on for a little fee. You can even have it sent to your savings account.

Through this, you can get your money as Philippine Peso and even send it to a loved one if you need to. Just like that, and you can spend your “bitcoins” just like regular money now.

Sure, we may not have fancy bitcoin ATMs all around the place (though if you live in the Makati area you may be in luck) or currency exchanges just next door, but we’re getting there. I hope that this guide has helped you in your future endeavors with bitcoin. It’s a tough world out there. And that’s it, The Filipino Kickstarter for Using Bitcoin. We’ve covered how to get started and what to do once you’re all set, and now it’s your turn. How will you kick your career further to the goal?

The Bitcoin Organization Philippines or BOP is a nonprofit organization, and a community of Filipino Bitcoin enthusiasts, where each can share ideas, speculate and organize meetings/meet-ups with fellow Bitcoiners. July 25, 2015 – Saturday, the organization had a meet-up, and hosted a booth at YouthHack Manila 2015’s Startup Fair.


Miguel and students at the BOP Booth

Several members of the Bitcoin Organization Philippines were present during YouthHack Manila 2015, as they managed the organization’s booth. Miguel Antonio Cuneta and his colleagues helped informing students, future tech entrepreneurs rather, about Bitcoin.


Katalyst.PH @ YouthHack Manila, a venture fund and member of the Bitcoin Organization Philippines was a major sponsor of the event. Katalyst also hosted a start-up workshop/presentation for the YouthHack Startup Challenge 2015: “Developing and Marketing the Next Unicorn Product” to educate and inform aspiring entrepreneurs about the key to success. The venture’s big name throughout YouthHack and its connections to Bitcoin therefore piqued several young entrepreneurs’s curiosity towards Bitcoin, while visiting the Bitcoin Organization Philippines’ booth.

The Bitcoin Organization Philippines’ booth during YouthHack MNL 2015

We may be seeing more of Katalyst and the Bitcoin Organization Philippines in
more hackathons, financial workshops and tech conventions in the Philippines in the future as both slowly extend their reach throughout the country.


NewsBTC Philippines has scheduled an interview with Katalyst.PH, and we may be hearing more of their plans early this week. Stay tuned for more corporate Bitcoin news in the Philippines.


Bitcoin has become inescapable all around the world. From the headlines in the papers to the top story in tonight’s news coverage, every now and then people talk about bitcoin, be it about a new service that accepts it or a rise or fall in exchange rates. But here in the Philippines, why should you care? Does the local sari-sari store even accept bitcoin? Does that person by the street even know what bitcoin is? So why should you consider accepting bitcoin in the first place?


To set up a credit card, you’ll need to fill out an application form for your profile and contact information, plus two government approved valid IDs. Plus, if you’re employed, you’d need your latest income tax return, a certificate of employment and a recent payslip.

Not to mention that most banks here in the Philippines require you to be 18 or 21, plus you would have to be employed long enough. Then you’d have to go to the bank you want to apply to, go through some background checks and screenings, give the requirements then you’d be asked to return for a day and sometimes as long as week, and then finally you have your credit card! Plus you have to pay way, way more with interest rates if you’re way past the deadline of a payment, and that goes to the bank, by the way, not the merchant. And then you only have to renew and wait one more time if you hit the expiry date! Yikes.

Literally all you need to sign up for a bitcoin account is usually an e-mail address and a password to come with it. If that’s not secure enough for you, there are wallets that come with two-factor authentication and even more security features if you are still feeling insecure. Plus it’s instant. There’s no age requirement too, so it opens up a whole new other audience, one that’s huge and really good for business: youngsters.


Sending bitcoin may take a while for a confirmation or two to take, maybe not instant, but it can be faster than a bank transaction, which makes it way more viable if you’re at a crisis and have to send someone money immediately.

Plus, considering that you have to wait so miners can verify transactions you make to ensure that it isn’t a ghost send or an unidentified or unauthorized transaction, the waiting only guarantees your precious money’s safety through internet lines. You never have to worry about an accident about the network being too slow and a transaction accidentally being doubled.

No more long lines for having to press a couple of buttons to open up the cash register, grab some change and the payment plus claiming the drink. Your customer could walk right in, send the amount to a scanned QR address you would just put up and just pick up their drink and be on their way. Not to mention your money is secure in a digital wallet with no one to touch it, no fear of a robbery, a hold-up or even a clerk grabbing a few coins, since the money is stored safely in your own secure virtual vault.


A wallet is free to make, and you can make as much as you want. No renewal fees, no interest and definitely no expiration date. Your account won’t die out or be frozen. Plus all you need to make a transaction is a decent connection to the internet, and just send the money to your local coffee shop’s address and there you have it, you have paid for coffee.

No need to pay any additional costs, minimizing transaction fees. Just a direct line from the consumer to you, and there’s no catch behind it.

So have you decided? How are you going to use bitcoin in your business?

Ayon sa gobyerno ng Pilipinas, inaasahang magkaroon ng 7% na paglaki sa ekonomiya ng Pilipinas ngayong taong 2015. Habang nananatiling napakaoptimistiko pa ang pamahalaan mula sa mahinang paglaki noong unang kapat na nagpakita ng pinakamababang pagangat sa ekonomiya sa tatlong taon nang nakalilipas. Sinabi naman ng World Bank na makakatulong ang pagkakaroon ng mga remittance at pagbagsak ng presyo ng langis sa ekonomiya. Kaya paano naman maaring pumasok ang bitcoin dito sa ating pagsasadula?

Sangkatutak ng mga remittance ang napapadala at natatangap mula sa ating mga kababayang nagibang bansa, o ang mga Overseas Filipino Workers. Gaya na lang sa sinabi ng World Bank, ang mga padala ay mas lalong makakatulong sa pagangat at paglaki ng ekonomiya, lalong lalo na salamat sa mga bagong serbisyong kakapasok pa lang sa publiko, tulad ng, at Palarin.

Tulad nang sinabi sa ating isa pang artikulo na sinasabi kung paano pinapadali ng bitcoin ang pagpapadala ng pera ng mga OFW sa kanilang mga pamilya, maasahang mapapadali rin ang pagangat ng ekonomiya sa paggamit ng mga nito.

Ayon ulit sa World Bank, ang Pilipinas ang pangalawang pinakamalaking bansang gumagamit ng remittance sa buong mundo. Sinasabi noong 2010 na $21 bilyon ang napadala sa Pilipinas, at lalong tumataas ito. Kaya hindi lang makakatulong ang mga remittance sa ating mga kababayan, maangat rin ang ekonomiya at mapapalawak rin ang paggamit ng bitcoin dito sa ating bansa.

Ang bitcoin ay isang napakabatang cryptocurrency, at tutuloy pa ang paglaki nito sa Pilipinas, lalong lalo na na makakatulong ito sa buhay ng napakarami nating kapamilyang nasa ibang bansa. Mayroon na ngang mga malalaking komunidad at mga kumbensyong ginaganap buwan buwan. Sa huli at sa hinaharap, mukhang may benepisyo ang pagsamasama at pagkampi ng ekonomiya ng Pilipinas at ang paggamit ng bitcoin dito sa ating bansa at sa buong mundo.

If you’ve lived under a rock for the past few years, you probably still don’t even know what Bitcoin is. To give you a quick rundown, Bitcoin is a decentralized peer-to-peer digital currency.

You’d probably think, “a what now?” Bitcoins are the currency of the internet, and is slowly being accepted as an alternative payment method due to its customer friendly transactions and ease of use, which is as easy as registering for a wallet, and boom! You have an digital bank account, as simple as that.

If you’re still tilting your head over what I just said, this video may be more enlightening:

Now you’re probably thinking, “Alright, so how can I even use this digital money here in the Philippines?”

A lot of retailers already accept Bitcoin as a payment method here in the Philippines. Discount sites like CashCashPinoy and MetroDeal already accept it, and it’s even safer, secure and faster than having to rummage around for a credit card, even escaping those pesky hidden fees made by banks.

Meanwhile, there are even certain branches of Manang’s Chicken that use it if you’re grabbing a bite to eat, or even certain traders who are willing to trade for Bitcoin. If you’re not willing to trade, there are even several Bitcoin ATMs and currency exchanges where you can buy Bitcoin or even sell them for several currencies, including Philippine peso or US dollar. This is especially useful if you need to send money, which is especially appealing if you know or are related to someone working overseas. Just go to the local exchange and have your money converted to Bitcoin and send it over, where your relative can convert it back to the local currency. It’s simple, faster, minimizes transaction fees and all you need is just a wallet.

Bitcoin here in the Philippines still has a long ways to go to become a viable main payment method, but it’s definitely wrong to say that it doesn’t have a presence here in the country. Nevertheless, it’s interesting to see what its entry would usher into the Philippine economy.