Bills Due Soon? Pay with Bitcoin at!

Some people think a digital currency would usually mean something like gold pieces from a video game or credit for online shopping, and while that would be true, the same just can’t be said for Bitcoin. The cryptocurrency has grown so much since its birth in 2009, and before its peak back when $25 worth of pizza were bought with 10,000 BTC. Sure, the exchange rate is just a meager fourth of what it was back then in 2012, and whether or not we see Bitcoin restored back to its so called “glory days” with soaring conversion rates, but it’s undeniable that this digital currency has been, is and will continue to be a big deal. Here in the Philippines, Bitcoin is still growing, but we’re getting there, nonetheless, as paying your bills has become easier with bitcoin.

That’s right. No more going to the local Bayad Center or your nearby Meralco branch just to pay your electric bill. allows you to get that over with real quick.

And not just that. Need to pay the Maynilad water bill? Credit card expenses due? Cignal needs a boost? Out of load? Need to pay your tuition for this semester?

Just by going to, go to Bill Payments, fill in your credentials and hit pay bill. Do note however, its better to pay way before the deadline. Just like that and you won’t have to whine about having to walk out when its that time of the month and the deadline’s up.

When you’re asked to go to the mall to pay your bills or make a roundtrip across the entire city to pay for electricity, water and school, why not just boot up your laptop and pay from there? So make sure to check out next time that happens.

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As a fourteen-year-old high school student who has to balance studying for a test and writing up an article, you’d assume my answer definitely has to be a yes, but say you had yourself quite a debt, and you’re flat broke with not a single peso in your pocket. Could bitcoin save you from such a crisis?

Well, yes. As long as you have skill and talent you can pretty much at least get somewhere in paying your debts. You’re a graphics artist? Why not show off your work and try to get hired by an indie game development team or a web developer needing resources? Think you can write music or voice act? How about HTML or CSS? There are many things you can get into to try and pay off your theoretical debt.

So yes, you can use it to get yourself a few extra bills in your pocket, but you shouldn’t exactly depend solely on bitcoin to pay for all your bills. Sure, if your income from bitcoin is really that big, why not, right? Still, bitcoin is better as a backup plan, if not just another bonus method of income. You’re better off doing your actual job than do a bitcoin job at the moment, but we’re not really answering the question.

For a very serious question, there’s really no serious answer that I can give. Startups that were successful would quickly jump in and say yes, and meanwhile bankers that lose from bitcoin’s growth would just say no. The typical bitcoin community member would try to get you to jump into the bandwagon and join in, while there’s always the guy who claims bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme (which I seriously have to keep saying every now and then, no it’s not!).

The truth in the end is that the question is way too broad to be answered; yet it’s still a very common query asked by newcomers who just recently discovered bitcoin and are interested. So take it from a young startup just making his first steps into the bitcoin community. I’m just a student, and I get to do what I like and want and for it I’m earning money and making friends.

From what I have gone through, to the people I’ve met, yes. Bitcoin is worth getting into. As long as you can persevere and work hard, something will surely come out of your bitcoin career.

Summer is long over, but do you really have to wait until the next holiday to book a flight or a reservation? The best resorts and hotels open slots ahead of time, and they’d be overloaded with callers and clients by the time December or summer arrives once more, just to be disappointed that they were all taken. Here’s a guide to prevent that from happening to you, and with bitcoin right by your side, you’ll be able to do it even faster and safer.


If you’re looking for simplicity, look no further than BTCTrip. Whether you’re from Manila or Cebu, it’s as simple as placing in your departure airport, your destination, leave date and return date. Then you can just tap ‘Search’ and it will grab you a list of flights that you can jump into and all the details you’ll need to know. So what’s the kicker? Well, you can buy a ticket to that flight with bitcoin, and just as simple as that, you’re all signed up and ready to fly!

Headed for Batanes? Book a flight to Basco! Bohol? Boracay? Or perhaps you’re going for an international flight? Headed for Tokyo or New York? Paris or London? BTCTrip makes the search easier, and paying fees with bitcoin minimizes transaction fees and additional costs your local flight agency or your airline might want to grab from you.


CashCashPinoy and MetroDeal are deal and discount sites, but it can be a lifesaver if you’re looking for a cheap steal. With stays at hotels or resorts, some including flight fees going as much as 25 and occasionally the lucky 95% off, it definitely is a site you should pay attention to. Maybe the flight you just booked was 50% off at CashCashPinoy, and it doesn’t hurt to check.

You could snag a trip to Cebu for half a grand, or a flight included deal to Boracay for two thousand from time to time, and once again, you can pay with bitcoin. These deals usually run a week, so you wouldn’t want to miss out.

So if you find yourself bored out of your mind during a holiday, now you can just grab your digital wallet and get anywhere with it, quite literally. So where have you decided to go this year?

If you’ve read the first part of this episodic informative article series, then you should be introduced to bitcoin already. You should already have a bitcoin wallet, know your bitcoin address and you should have an active presence in the community. So you’ve gotten yourself some bitcoin, now what are you going to do with it? You’re not exactly going to twiddle your thumbs again until something happens right? Just think of it, your first purchase. What could it be? That nice handbag or that new video game you’ve been saving up for all year? Isn’t it exciting? Well, what if you could pay for it – with bitcoin?


So you already got yourself money by being on your computer all day long? Well, why not make it even more 21st century by spending that money being on your computer all day long? There are already many Philippine services you can spend your money on, from CashCashPinoy and MetroDeal we’ve already mentioned so many times and through going to the local community groups to see if you can come to a deal. Certain merchants accept bitcoin on OLX and other peer-to-peer merchant sites, so why not?

Bitcoin transfers are quicker and more secure, but they can be fraudulent, so before buying anything, ensure that the merchant you’re buying from has a good reputation and has good and positive feedback from previous customers. If the item you want can be found online and are purchasable with bitcoin as a payment method, you’re in luck.


If you ever had the misfortune of having to deal with a site that has what you want but doesn’t accept bitcoin as a payment method, it may be a bit tricky. If you want something on Amazon or eBay, a gift card might do the trick. The best place to get gift cards are on Gyft, which is for US users only, so you may want to chat up a friend or a community member who can get that for you, try other sites.

PayPal can be a handy, as PayPal isn’t exactly confident and comfortable with bitcoin around the place, and they’re pretty open about it. If you really positively have to use PayPal, you can try having it traded through a merchant or follow the next part of the guide.


For those of you whose fathers, mothers and relatives are Overseas Filipino Workers or OFWs, you may already be familiar with remittances. This is money sent by a worker abroad to his or her family, and while you’re not exactly the target audience, it’s still pretty great and reliable. and allow you to send bitcoin and pick it up at their HQ for free or at your local LBC, Cebuana Lhuillier and so on for a little fee. You can even have it sent to your savings account.

Through this, you can get your money as Philippine Peso and even send it to a loved one if you need to. Just like that, and you can spend your “bitcoins” just like regular money now.

Sure, we may not have fancy bitcoin ATMs all around the place (though if you live in the Makati area you may be in luck) or currency exchanges just next door, but we’re getting there. I hope that this guide has helped you in your future endeavors with bitcoin. It’s a tough world out there. And that’s it, The Filipino Kickstarter for Using Bitcoin. We’ve covered how to get started and what to do once you’re all set, and now it’s your turn. How will you kick your career further to the goal?

So, you’re from the Philippines and you want to get into bitcoin? This guide is designed to help you get started and give you a kick start ahead into the bitcoin community. This article isn’t strictly for Filipino newcomers, but a lot of the tips here will refer to bitcoin services that are available or supported in the Philippines.


The first thing you want to do is to get yourself a wallet. Your wallet is basically your account in the bitcoin community, and you’re going to need it if you’re going to get into cryptocurrency. A bitcoin wallet holds your private keys that you need to spend or use your bitcoins. Once you obtain one, you’ll be given a bitcoin address, a “username” you’ll be using and giving to others so that they can interact with your wallet, allowing them to send you bitcoin in return.

There are many ways to get yourself a wallet. For a beginner, I highly recommend Blockchain, GreenAddress and Coinbase. These are web wallets, which means that you’ll need an internet browser to go to the corresponding wallet provider’s website to access it. All of them have mobile apps as well, so you can send and receive funds on the go.

Getting a web wallet is as simple as signing up in the provider’s website and that’s it – you have a bitcoin wallet.

Once you’re done with that, get used to the interface, read up a couple guides, get yourself a few satoshis at a faucet or two, and when you’re finished twiddling your thumbs and you’re finally ready to step up, move on.


So now you have a wallet. Now what? You don’t really think you can get yourself your first millibit by gambling all day at Primedice or hanging out at the faucet 24/7, do you? Now what you’re going to want to do is to get into the bitcoin community. Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer network, so you’re not exactly going anywhere without peers.

Why not sign yourself up at the forums, get yourself a job at /r/Jobs4Bitcoins on Reddit or chat up someone you know who’s already into bitcoin? Look up Philippine bitcoin communities on Facebook or Twitter, or even get yourself into a group or two. There’s the Bitcoin PH and Bitcoin Organization of the Philippines groups as well, so if you already have a Facebook, you can get yourself into those.

Just introduce yourself and talk to people. You’re not going anywhere without completing this step, but it’s not at all that hard. The Bitcoin community is huge, and you don’t have to lock yourself into one group. Get your friends to join and team up, and maybe, just maybe, you’d find yourself signing up for a job.


Okay, this part can be a little challenging. You might say, “I don’t even make a single cent in real life and you expect me to get employed that fast just by meeting random strangers on the internet?!”, and to that I respond: Well, no. Meeting people you can get to know on the internet is as easy as getting into a bitcoin-themed chatbox and the occasional cryptocurrency chat roulette, and getting yourself a job on the internet and getting paid for it sounds a little suspicious and a little bit of a scam, after all, isn’t that everybody’s dream?

So let’s just set it straight, you’re not going to be making any notable income if you have absolutely nothing to offer, but isn’t that kind of why you’re looking for a job? Because you know you can do something and want to get paid for it? What are you already great at? If you’re already great at writing code, composing music or drawing artworks then chances are you have already have a good chance at getting yourself a job. Go ahead and sign up a bitcoin job finder or try it’s sub-reddit at /r/Jobs4Bitcoins.


Next time, we’ll talk about using the money you’ve earned, and what services you can use to spend the precious bitcoins you’ll be saving up. We’ll be talking about currency exchanges, remittances and some services you may need to understand to get further with bitcoin.

This guide may have been a little harsh, and not exactly welcoming, and that’s not the vibe I wanted to give off when writing this guide. The truth is, the bitcoin community isn’t all that hard to get into, but the thing is, you have to learn to make an effort. There’s no real magic trick that will get yourself those bitcoins, there’s no special formula or ten steps to follow to suddenly have wads of cash. It’s all just hard work, but in the end, it’s surely paid off.

Bitcoin has become inescapable all around the world. From the headlines in the papers to the top story in tonight’s news coverage, every now and then people talk about bitcoin, be it about a new service that accepts it or a rise or fall in exchange rates. But here in the Philippines, why should you care? Does the local sari-sari store even accept bitcoin? Does that person by the street even know what bitcoin is? So why should you consider accepting bitcoin in the first place?


To set up a credit card, you’ll need to fill out an application form for your profile and contact information, plus two government approved valid IDs. Plus, if you’re employed, you’d need your latest income tax return, a certificate of employment and a recent payslip.

Not to mention that most banks here in the Philippines require you to be 18 or 21, plus you would have to be employed long enough. Then you’d have to go to the bank you want to apply to, go through some background checks and screenings, give the requirements then you’d be asked to return for a day and sometimes as long as week, and then finally you have your credit card! Plus you have to pay way, way more with interest rates if you’re way past the deadline of a payment, and that goes to the bank, by the way, not the merchant. And then you only have to renew and wait one more time if you hit the expiry date! Yikes.

Literally all you need to sign up for a bitcoin account is usually an e-mail address and a password to come with it. If that’s not secure enough for you, there are wallets that come with two-factor authentication and even more security features if you are still feeling insecure. Plus it’s instant. There’s no age requirement too, so it opens up a whole new other audience, one that’s huge and really good for business: youngsters.


Sending bitcoin may take a while for a confirmation or two to take, maybe not instant, but it can be faster than a bank transaction, which makes it way more viable if you’re at a crisis and have to send someone money immediately.

Plus, considering that you have to wait so miners can verify transactions you make to ensure that it isn’t a ghost send or an unidentified or unauthorized transaction, the waiting only guarantees your precious money’s safety through internet lines. You never have to worry about an accident about the network being too slow and a transaction accidentally being doubled.

No more long lines for having to press a couple of buttons to open up the cash register, grab some change and the payment plus claiming the drink. Your customer could walk right in, send the amount to a scanned QR address you would just put up and just pick up their drink and be on their way. Not to mention your money is secure in a digital wallet with no one to touch it, no fear of a robbery, a hold-up or even a clerk grabbing a few coins, since the money is stored safely in your own secure virtual vault.


A wallet is free to make, and you can make as much as you want. No renewal fees, no interest and definitely no expiration date. Your account won’t die out or be frozen. Plus all you need to make a transaction is a decent connection to the internet, and just send the money to your local coffee shop’s address and there you have it, you have paid for coffee.

No need to pay any additional costs, minimizing transaction fees. Just a direct line from the consumer to you, and there’s no catch behind it.

So have you decided? How are you going to use bitcoin in your business?

Ayon sa gobyerno ng Pilipinas, inaasahang magkaroon ng 7% na paglaki sa ekonomiya ng Pilipinas ngayong taong 2015. Habang nananatiling napakaoptimistiko pa ang pamahalaan mula sa mahinang paglaki noong unang kapat na nagpakita ng pinakamababang pagangat sa ekonomiya sa tatlong taon nang nakalilipas. Sinabi naman ng World Bank na makakatulong ang pagkakaroon ng mga remittance at pagbagsak ng presyo ng langis sa ekonomiya. Kaya paano naman maaring pumasok ang bitcoin dito sa ating pagsasadula?

Sangkatutak ng mga remittance ang napapadala at natatangap mula sa ating mga kababayang nagibang bansa, o ang mga Overseas Filipino Workers. Gaya na lang sa sinabi ng World Bank, ang mga padala ay mas lalong makakatulong sa pagangat at paglaki ng ekonomiya, lalong lalo na salamat sa mga bagong serbisyong kakapasok pa lang sa publiko, tulad ng, at Palarin.

Tulad nang sinabi sa ating isa pang artikulo na sinasabi kung paano pinapadali ng bitcoin ang pagpapadala ng pera ng mga OFW sa kanilang mga pamilya, maasahang mapapadali rin ang pagangat ng ekonomiya sa paggamit ng mga nito.

Ayon ulit sa World Bank, ang Pilipinas ang pangalawang pinakamalaking bansang gumagamit ng remittance sa buong mundo. Sinasabi noong 2010 na $21 bilyon ang napadala sa Pilipinas, at lalong tumataas ito. Kaya hindi lang makakatulong ang mga remittance sa ating mga kababayan, maangat rin ang ekonomiya at mapapalawak rin ang paggamit ng bitcoin dito sa ating bansa.

Ang bitcoin ay isang napakabatang cryptocurrency, at tutuloy pa ang paglaki nito sa Pilipinas, lalong lalo na na makakatulong ito sa buhay ng napakarami nating kapamilyang nasa ibang bansa. Mayroon na ngang mga malalaking komunidad at mga kumbensyong ginaganap buwan buwan. Sa huli at sa hinaharap, mukhang may benepisyo ang pagsamasama at pagkampi ng ekonomiya ng Pilipinas at ang paggamit ng bitcoin dito sa ating bansa at sa buong mundo.

If you’ve lived under a rock for the past few years, you probably still don’t even know what Bitcoin is. To give you a quick rundown, Bitcoin is a decentralized peer-to-peer digital currency.

You’d probably think, “a what now?” Bitcoins are the currency of the internet, and is slowly being accepted as an alternative payment method due to its customer friendly transactions and ease of use, which is as easy as registering for a wallet, and boom! You have an digital bank account, as simple as that.

If you’re still tilting your head over what I just said, this video may be more enlightening:

Now you’re probably thinking, “Alright, so how can I even use this digital money here in the Philippines?”

A lot of retailers already accept Bitcoin as a payment method here in the Philippines. Discount sites like CashCashPinoy and MetroDeal already accept it, and it’s even safer, secure and faster than having to rummage around for a credit card, even escaping those pesky hidden fees made by banks.

Meanwhile, there are even certain branches of Manang’s Chicken that use it if you’re grabbing a bite to eat, or even certain traders who are willing to trade for Bitcoin. If you’re not willing to trade, there are even several Bitcoin ATMs and currency exchanges where you can buy Bitcoin or even sell them for several currencies, including Philippine peso or US dollar. This is especially useful if you need to send money, which is especially appealing if you know or are related to someone working overseas. Just go to the local exchange and have your money converted to Bitcoin and send it over, where your relative can convert it back to the local currency. It’s simple, faster, minimizes transaction fees and all you need is just a wallet.

Bitcoin here in the Philippines still has a long ways to go to become a viable main payment method, but it’s definitely wrong to say that it doesn’t have a presence here in the country. Nevertheless, it’s interesting to see what its entry would usher into the Philippine economy.

According to the Commission on Filipinos Overseas in 2012, over 10 million Filipinos work abroad, away from their families and friends, to earn and profit more to be able to provide and support their family enough. That’s over 10% of the Philippine population! It’s certainly undeniable that a lot of our countrymen most definitely persevere miles and miles away from a familiar face, just to be able to sustain not only themselves in a foreign place, but also the family they have to provide and nurture for. In occasion with the past Father’s Day, let us not just sit idly but think: how many of us have fathers that skip meals just to be able to send that extra cash that will later be used for tomorrow’s lunch and dinner?

You might be asking in your head, “Alright, so where does Bitcoin fall in all this?”

Bitcoin has everything to do with this. Overseas Filipino Workers, or OFWs for short, don’t just magically conjure up and send their earnings directly to their families. And so here comes remittance, in which you put in a request to send money so that your family could pick it up, and the steps can be quite lengthy.

First, you’d have to go to the local bank where you have to ask to do a remittance, where your foreign currency is usually converted to Philippine peso, sometimes decreasing the value of your earnings, especially in a financial crisis when you really have to send money now and the conversion rate is really, really bad. Then you’d have to wait for the bank to process the transaction, and you’ll be charged with a transaction fee. Next, enter your relative or friend, who would wait for hours, days and sometimes weeks for the transaction to finally be verified and be pushed through, where he or she has to just pick it up, which is very inconvenient when in the previously mentioned financial crisis. Plus, there’s another transaction fee that needs to be paid for the delivery and receiving of the money. Not only can the waiting be long, but the conversion and transaction fees can most definitely hinder and reduce the budget your family receives.

Thanks to services like Rebit, this process is simplified. With Bitcoin already huge in areas where OFWs are mostly based, especially in first world countries, local Bitcoin exchanges are very common, and you just need to bring your earnings, have it converted to Bitcoin and sent to your wallet. Afterwards, you just have it sent and delivered, while your family waits, and it takes just a matter of minutes to verify the transactions in contrast to days and weeks. Your recipient will then receive a message that the money is now available for pickup. Not only was the processing and verification a lot faster, it also minimizes transaction fees and can even give a boost to your earnings.

So we’ve shown how Overseas Filipino Workers can benefit from the opportunities presented by Bitcoin. Not only does it make it simpler to send money to your loved ones in a time of need, for as the world adapts and is shaped further by the Bitcoin economy and its community, we certainly find new ways and ideas to make the easy even easier and the fast even faster.